Sunday, 19 October 2014

“You want me to call you Goddess?”

Here is an interesting take on Siri.

I heard him talking to Siri about music, and Siri offered some suggestions. “I don’t like that kind of music,” Gus snapped. Siri replied, “You’re certainly entitled to your opinion.” Siri’s politeness reminded Gus what he owed Siri. “Thank you for that music, though,” Gus said. Siri replied, “You don’t need to thank me.” “Oh, yes,” Gus added emphatically, “I do.”

(Via Danny Yee’s blog)

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Friday, 17 October 2014

muddled metaphors

Theresa May and muddled metaphors:
But she added that there was “a necessity in having the material in order to be able to search it in a very targeted way” and it was “hugely important” to have “large amounts” of it. 
“The ability to interrogate that bulk data – to look for that needle in the haystack – is an important part of the processes that people go through in order to keep us safe,” she told the intelligence and security committee.
Actually, when looking for a needle in a haystack, the smaller the haystack, the easier the problem!




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Thursday, 16 October 2014

Google Android Lollipop lolwot?

On my phone this BBC headline came up as Google readies Android Lollipop

I understood the headline instantly.  But the me of 10, 20, 30 years ago?  Gibberish!





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Wednesday, 15 October 2014

A Geometrical Derivation of a Family of Quantum Speed Limit Results

New paper on the arXiv:

Benjamin Russell, Susan Stepney.
A Geometrical Derivation of a Family of Quantum Speed Limit Results
arXiv:1410.3209 [quant-ph]



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Tuesday, 14 October 2014

Monday, 13 October 2014

sequestering carbon, several book shelves at a time

We have a lot of bookshelves to house our book collection.  But even so, they are filling up.

Once every wall is covered with shelves, and all the shelves are full, but more books enter the house, what next?  (Did I hear someone say, “get rid of some books”?  Wash your mouth out!)

What happens next is bookshelves not against the wall.

the U-shaped, double-sided, brick-and-plank shelves start to grow up from the floor
You can see 45m of nearly full shelves against the far wall.  There is another 45m of nearly full shelves on the wall opposite.  And more on the wall opposite the window.

the nearly completed shelves
This increases the shelf capacity of the room by 50%, which should last for a few more years at least.

completed shelves, from the other side, populated with books from the far wall,
which is now less crowded, allowing room for expansion

We haven’t yet needed to resort to more extreme options:

We're gonna need a stronger floor



Saturday, 11 October 2014

crushed

Most books that arrive through the post survive the journey.

A few arrive the worse for wear:


Note to sender: a thin plastic envelope provides little structural protection.